Linux commands to get your hardware details

This is no new invention, i’m just combining already existing Linux commands to help others have results of several commands in one file and use the file for their needs.

You may be in need of the details of your hardware specifications probably to to go download the drivers. Windows users use specialized softwares for this. if you’re un Ubuntu, there’re commands for this, if you’re on windows, u can boot on a live ubuntu CD and type the command, get your details and move along:

Open your terminal and type :
1) lspci ==> it gives a list of your PCI devices
2) lsusb ==> list all your USB devices
you can sucessively type those commands , then redirect in one file (text file) that will summarize your hardware configurations:

Step 1 ; lspci > myHardware.txt // creats a text file in present working directory with PCI list
step 2: lsusb >> myHardware.txt // adds the usb list to the already existing text file 🙂

you can consult (and copy too) the “myHardware.txt” file and see your hardware configurations:

Finally another command gives detail informations concerning the hardware, so detailed such that for the processor (for example), you get different clock speeds, slots, capabilities,sizes etc.. of your cache memories (as shown in the fragment below).

Hardware details displayed from linux commands

Hardware details displayed from linux commands

But this last command only display the results if run by the root user. It takes some reasonable time to display since the informations is much. So when typed, you need patience.

command ==> “ lshw

To store in a file also, you can use

sudo lshw > myHardwareDetails.txt

Thanks for reading 🙂

TMUX – Terminal multiplexer, It helps

Good morning dear readers and friends………
TMUX is just a Linux command that can easy one’s life. According to the manual (type “man tmux” in your Linux terminal),
TMUX is a terminal multiplexer: it enables a number of terminals to be created, accessed, and controlled from a single screen (single terminal window precisely)…..”

The manual page is sufficiently clear, i’m just so impressed that i’ll just demonstrate a basic thing I learned about it and how I use it. Basically I open one command window, split it into 2 or 3 panes and run my commands into these panes and have results of all my tasks in ONE SCREEN.
No need to install anything, it comes by default on BSD systems like Ubuntu. Personally, i’m on Ubuntu 12.04.

To launch, open your terminal and type “tmux”, it opens one window with one pane 🙂

The shortcuts of tmux program is accessed in same manner i.e Ctrl+B followed by a command key demonstrated below :

1) type <Ctrl + B > , then press <% >, it splits ya screen into 2 vertical panes, (if < “ > was used in place of <%>, your screen will be split horizontally), you can keep splitting it the way you like. Here is a capture of mine (I have 1 screen with 3 panes)

NB : ignore the “<” and “>” signs when typing in your terminal

Sample splitted TMUX screen capture

Sample splitted TMUX screen capture

Sample splitted TMUX screen capture

Sample splitted TMUX screen capture

2) I can type my “PING” in one pane to verify my Internet connection, “top” in another to keep an eye on my processor activity etc……… But to navigate from pane to pane here is the combination: <Ctrl+B>, then press letter <O>
3) to quit a pane, type <exit>, and when u successively quit all panes, then you’ve successfully quited tmux itself

TMUX is effective and easy to use, the list of short cut command keys is found in the manual, here is a screen capture of that potion of the manual

tmux command shortcut list

tmux command shortcut list

Thanks for reading 🙂